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Author Topic: For stadiums, game over is approaching  (Read 985 times)
Throw Long Bannatyne
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« on: July 27, 2020, 08:27:17 PM »

Interesting article on stadium size in the Globe and Mail, the future and the past, bigger is no longer better and the SkyDome a relic after 31 years may soon become a victim of the wrecking ball.

"The Rogers Centre?s dismal history certainly isn?t a selling point for governments. Initially budgeted at $150-million, it cost at least $570-million to build, much of it taxpayers? money. Rogers bought it in 2005 for about $25-million, roughly 4 per cent of its original construction cost. In a city of rising real estate prices, it managed to plummet. A 1990 government report said the SkyDome would need to be booked 600 days a year to be profitable."

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-for-stadiums-game-over-is-approaching/

I think both Wpg. and Sask. did a great job sizing their new stadiums for the actual demand, if these structures become obsolete within 50 years I'd be very surprised.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 08:34:53 PM by Throw Long Bannatyne » Logged
pjrocksmb
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« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2020, 11:25:02 PM »

build em right, build em for a reasonable cost and build them the right size, interesting read thanks

Sask and Wpg built the right size but the deficiencies in the Wpg build might make 50 years tough
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I don't watch the No Fun League b/c I live in Canada and love the CFL
John T.
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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2020, 02:00:41 AM »

Anyone who's ever been to an NFL game or rock concert in a 60,000 seat or bigger stadium, and sat up high, knows (whether they'll admit it or not) that it's pointless as far as watching the game in any detail.

35,000 to 40,000 is about the biggest that you can make a stadium while still providing good seating for actually watching the game. Everything above that number is simply to generate revenue and give people somewhere to party. Now that it looks like the revenue part is drying up, we're left with buildings that are way too big, way too expensive, and basically...stupid.
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DM83
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« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2020, 05:51:42 AM »

No offense, but, do you have  something about "belonging" and being a member of somethings?
Growing up with a family history of football on a Friday, Saturday or Sunday is a tradition, which alumni support programs that allow kids to be "part" of something.

Your comment lacks understanding of many people's needs.
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John T.
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« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2020, 01:58:09 PM »

No offense, but, do you have  something about "belonging" and being a member of somethings?
Growing up with a family history of football on a Friday, Saturday or Sunday is a tradition, which alumni support programs that allow kids to be "part" of something.

Your comment lacks understanding of many people's needs.

Except that...it doesn't.

These huge stadiums made sense as long as they were being filled. They no longer are, and it's virtually certain that they won't be in the future. Being a "part" of something works for kids when they had things like the Salisbury House Kids' Zone. These days, an exhibition ticket for a nosebleed seat in an NFL stadium costs $100 or more. There's no being a "part" of something at that price.

What we're seeing is pro sports self-selecting their in-person fans through a combination of high prices and crappy seats, to the point where 40,000 will be as many as they can hope for, much of the time. Therefore, it makes more sense for new stadiums to be much smaller. Actual occurrences in recent years support this idea, in baseball especially, but in general, too.
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pjrocksmb
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« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2020, 11:20:16 PM »

Except that...it doesn't.

These huge stadiums made sense as long as they were being filled. They no longer are, and it's virtually certain that they won't be in the future. Being a "part" of something works for kids when they had things like the Salisbury House Kids' Zone. These days, an exhibition ticket for a nosebleed seat in an NFL stadium costs $100 or more. There's no being a "part" of something at that price.

What we're seeing is pro sports self-selecting their in-person fans through a combination of high prices and crappy seats, to the point where 40,000 will be as many as they can hope for, much of the time. Therefore, it makes more sense for new stadiums to be much smaller. Actual occurrences in recent years support this idea, in baseball especially, but in general, too.

Tend to agree with you
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I don't watch the No Fun League b/c I live in Canada and love the CFL
buckzumhoff
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« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2020, 02:06:00 AM »

NFL stadiums are full. . They need 70 000 seats. People pay alot of money for prime seats .  Need extra seats that are affordable. Might as well build it big . .I agree baseball stadiums are too big. But not football.
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TecnoGenius
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« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2020, 03:05:54 AM »

I must say that the huge NFL stadiums are darn impressive on TV when I watch the playoffs & SB.  Completely full from top to bottom.  I've never experienced a huge NFL stadium in person, but I'd jump at the chance if I was ever in a US city at the right time.  I've been to plenty of big baseball stadiums, but it's not really the same vibe, and except for playoffs half the stadium is always empty.
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dd
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« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2020, 03:41:27 AM »

It only makes sense to build to your markets demands. Rogers stadium, the Big O in Montreal , commonwealth stadium and B.C. place are all examples of stadiums builts way too big for what their respective markets needed.
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Blue In BC
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« Reply #9 on: August 02, 2020, 04:35:30 PM »

It only makes sense to build to your markets demands. Rogers stadium, the Big O in Montreal , commonwealth stadium and B.C. place are all examples of stadiums builts way too big for what their respective markets needed.

Stadiums are used for more than just CFL football. Car shows, home shows, concerts etc etc. Each city has different demand needs but it's not uncommon for a stadium to be used 200+ days in a year in larger cities.

At times a single stadium had multiple sports using the stadium. High school and college sports events.

However in general you are correct. Very large stadiums may become a thing of the past.

I say that at the same time I notice the new NFL stadium in Las Vegas cost $1.9B. YIKES.
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DM83
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« Reply #10 on: August 02, 2020, 06:20:11 PM »

What is your source of pricing for. Nose bleed seats in pick an NFL city.?
Have you ever been to,one and sat "up there"

And finally, life is more than  just $.  If a person values something, then they decide to pay for it. I am not sure you understand.
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Blue In BC
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« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2020, 06:39:48 PM »

What is your source of pricing for. Nose bleed seats in pick an NFL city.?
Have you ever been to,one and sat "up there"

And finally, life is more than  just $.  If a person values something, then they decide to pay for it. I am not sure you understand.

I'm not sure who you are asking.

However some cities have less opportunities for discretionary spending. For a city like Regina, football is almost like a cult following. Nothing wrong with that but compare what people might also in bigger cities like Montreal, Toronto or Vancouver. Those cities not only have teams in other sports but other things people can / will do that aren't always available in smaller cities.

That's the same in some NFL or NHL cities. Population goes a long way in making size decisions.
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No more excuses.
New_Earth_Mud
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« Reply #12 on: August 03, 2020, 12:16:00 AM »

From what i understand BC place didnt want to commit to the CFL as a hub as it could make way more money if other things opened  up to them.
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dd
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« Reply #13 on: August 03, 2020, 05:42:15 AM »

Stadiums are used for more than just CFL football. Car shows, home shows, concerts etc etc. Each city has different demand needs but it's not uncommon for a stadium to be used 200+ days in a year in larger cities.

At times a single stadium had multiple sports using the stadium. High school and college sports events.

However in general you are correct. Very large stadiums may become a thing of the past.

I say that at the same time I notice the new NFL stadium in Las Vegas cost $1.9B. YIKES.
Does anyone know a reliable figure for how many days IGF is used per year??
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Throw Long Bannatyne
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« Reply #14 on: August 03, 2020, 06:00:29 AM »

From what i understand BC place didnt want to commit to the CFL as a hub as it could make way more money if other things opened  up to them.

Nope.

"Following the Province of British Columbia?s directive to cancel mass gatherings during the COVID-19 outbreak, major events scheduled for the immediate future at BC Place will not proceed until further notice."

https://www.bcplace.com/
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