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Author Topic: Information on a Reduced Season [UPD: 2020 Season Officially Cancelled]  (Read 10308 times)
Blue In BC
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« Reply #255 on: August 18, 2020, 03:35:52 PM »

Look, despite the disappointment felt by all, and the inherent wish all posters have to defend their previously held positions, there are some indisputable facts that should be obvious by now:

1.  The CFL financial model was simply not capable of executing a season without fans, comparisons to leagues with higher percentage of revenues from other sources are simply not relevant.

2. Even though Ambrosie pooched a lot of how this was handled, the financial structure of the league was something he inherited.  He can't be blamed for the fiscal improbability of a bubble season.

3.  The fact that the feds wanted some interest for their money was not the deal breaker.  All of the private and community owners in the CFL can borrow $3.5 million per team.  The private owners wanted free money, and I am 100% convinced that had they received an interest free loan, in 2 years they would have been looking to have the loan forgiven.  Same old game of socializing risk and privatizing profit.

4.  The notion that this could have been pulled off with more private ownership is laughable, considering the history of the CFL.  Here is a list of private owners off the top of my head:  Nelson Skalbania, Murray Pezim, Horn Chen, the Gliebermans, Larry Ryckman, Michael Feterik and Bruce McNall.  Now to be fair, only 3 of those guys were actually convicted of fraud, the rest were simply incompetent.   The CFL literally bats about .500 with private owners, with every second one being a potential franchise destroyer.  

5.  While I think Reilly and BLM contracts are too high, that's not the problem with the league.  The Bombers run about $30 million a year in revenues, and only $5.2 million goes to players.  (17%).  If you ask me, over the 40 or so years I have been following the CFL, the size of coaching staffs, number of executives, and ancillary positions like marketing, video coordinators, etc.  have grown exponentially.   Capping coaching and other football ops staff was necessary, but they need to go through the non-ops business with same discipline.  

Pretty much what you said. Every team has the same SMS so a QB like Reilly or BLM getting a big chunk of that doesn't directly hurt. Indirectly it might water down the rest of the roster but every salary is a calculated risk in that sense.  Calgary had a good season but BC tanked after giving up veterans to make room for Reilly.
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TBURGESS
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« Reply #256 on: August 18, 2020, 04:39:34 PM »

IMO BC tanked because their coaching staff was woefully inadequate more than overpaying Reilly.
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Blue In BC
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« Reply #257 on: August 18, 2020, 05:17:15 PM »

IMO BC tanked because their coaching staff was woefully inadequate more than overpaying Reilly.

Well yes and no. They didn't have enough young ELC players up and coming in their overall depth. To make SMS room for Reilly they had to release some good talent. Obviously coaching was an issue as well but the roster talent wasn't there.

It's simple math, the more you spend in one place the less you can in another place. We saw that during the off season as veterans were displaced.

OTOH, the Stamps have always had good young up coming talent on ELC's and don't need as much big free agent signings. The could had Arbuckle in the wings if that chosen that route.

Like I said it's how you spend your money across a given roster. The Stamps aside from QB had a much better roster and that was no fluke.

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Throw Long Bannatyne
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« Reply #258 on: August 18, 2020, 05:22:24 PM »

Look, despite the disappointment felt by all, and the inherent wish all posters have to defend their previously held positions, there are some indisputable facts that should be obvious by now:

1.  The CFL financial model was simply not capable of executing a season without fans, comparisons to leagues with higher percentage of revenues from other sources are simply not relevant.

2. Even though Ambrosie pooched a lot of how this was handled, the financial structure of the league was something he inherited.  He can't be blamed for the fiscal improbability of a bubble season.

3.  The fact that the feds wanted some interest for their money was not the deal breaker.  All of the private and community owners in the CFL can borrow $3.5 million per team.  The private owners wanted free money, and I am 100% convinced that had they received an interest free loan, in 2 years they would have been looking to have the loan forgiven.  Same old game of socializing risk and privatizing profit.

4.  The notion that this could have been pulled off with more private ownership is laughable, considering the history of the CFL.  Here is a list of private owners off the top of my head:  Nelson Skalbania, Murray Pezim, Horn Chen, the Gliebermans, Larry Ryckman, Michael Feterik and Bruce McNall.  Now to be fair, only 3 of those guys were actually convicted of fraud, the rest were simply incompetent.   The CFL literally bats about .500 with private owners, with every second one being a potential franchise destroyer.  

5.  While I think Reilly and BLM contracts are too high, that's not the problem with the league.  The Bombers run about $30 million a year in revenues, and only $5.2 million goes to players.  (17%).  If you ask me, over the 40 or so years I have been following the CFL, the size of coaching staffs, number of executives, and ancillary positions like marketing, video coordinators, etc.  have grown exponentially.   Capping coaching and other football ops staff was necessary, but they need to go through the non-ops business with same discipline.  

Good post, in regard to #5 I think the CFL used all the recommended marketing tools they could to attain "big league" status but never achieved the revenue streams needed to pull it off, nor did they find a "sugar daddy" to finance their program.  Growing a business is tough, especially when working against market forces and a declining plus aging fan base.  Wade Miller being the huckster he is, did everything he could to turn lemons into lemonade with the hub plan, unfortunately not everyone bought in. 

If the CFL survives (this time), I think we are going to see a scaled back version that matches the reality of their revenue stream, that's how businesses survive, more fiscal responsibility, less gloss, cuts will be made in every dept., less employees plus a smaller roster and football dept.  Players won't like it, fans won't like it, many will probably tune out permanently but that seems to be the bleak reality for the league's immediate future, it's sink or swim time.
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blue_gold_84
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« Reply #259 on: August 24, 2020, 02:38:25 PM »

The opt-out period begins today and will continue until next Monday. Players' rights will be retained by their respective CFL teams should they opt out to try signing in the NFL.
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Blue In BC
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« Reply #260 on: August 24, 2020, 04:12:29 PM »

The opt-out period begins today and will continue until next Monday. Players' rights will be retained by their respective CFL teams should they opt out to try signing in the NFL.

The one week only opt out is interesting. Players aren't getting paid by CFL teams and there are many players on 1 year deals expiring in 2020.

MBT is the 1st to opt out of his contract. Is there a time limit on him getting an NFL offer? He'd be a free agent in February in any case and could be trying that for the 2021 season as well.

Does a player opting out have an opportunity for the XFL or is is he restricted to NFL?

All of this seems a little vague. Maybe it's the wording being used. It seems to me if you opt out of a contract that is not being paid, you're a free agent. Period? This sounds more like an attempt to create only a window.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 04:15:25 PM by Blue In BC » Logged

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blue_gold_84
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« Reply #261 on: August 24, 2020, 05:00:50 PM »

The one week only opt out is interesting. Players aren't getting paid by CFL teams and there are many players on 1 year deals expiring in 2020.

MBT is the 1st to opt out of his contract. Is there a time limit on him getting an NFL offer? He'd be a free agent in February in any case and could be trying that for the 2021 season as well.

Does a player opting out have an opportunity for the XFL or is is he restricted to NFL?

All of this seems a little vague. Maybe it's the wording being used. It seems to me if you opt out of a contract that is not being paid, you're a free agent. Period? This sounds more like an attempt to create only a window.

Unfortunately, the details thus far are indeed vague at best; nothing new from the non-transparent CFL. From what I can tell, players' rights play a central role in the degree to which an opt-out participant is a free agent. Perhaps it's a good faith type of agreement between the teams and the players to prevent a chaotic free agency situation whenever the CFL can resume its "normal" operations.

I believe Brett Lauther was the first to use the opt-out option yesterday but that's neither here nor there. I don't know how likely any of these participants will be to land a contract in the NFL but it's better than nothing at this point for them.

Dave Campbell with CHED said those opt-out participants vying for NFL aspirations into 2021 or 2022 will have to sign with a NFL team by Jan. 31st in order for this opt-out arrangement to be honoured vis a vis their existing CFL contract.

So, it's an opt-out with conditions from what I've read by what's been shared by those connected to the league.
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Blue In BC
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« Reply #262 on: August 24, 2020, 05:11:07 PM »

I don't understand how any of the players contracts are still legally binding. That's essentially my question.

Whether players have any real chance at catching on with NFL or XFL is almost moot.

OTOH for players with contracts longer than 2020, it may NOT be in their best interests to become free agents at the moment.

The reality is that it depends where up the contract ladder your contract sits. Players on ELC's would seem more likely to want to opt out. Players making $100K+ going into 2021 less likely.

Starting with all the rookies signed for TC. That must be about 300 players across the CFL. No pay for 2020 and only an ELC going into 2021 if they even make a roster. I'd think all of them would bolt and be looking at the XFL if NFL doesn't pan out.

Then all the 1st year players in 2019 whose contracts expire in Feb 2021. That's a large group around the CFL as well.
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the paw
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« Reply #263 on: August 24, 2020, 05:12:16 PM »

Dakoda Shepley and Richie Leone have also opted out.

.
This is nothing to panic about.  Most won't get a deal, a few may end up on extended practice roster.  I don't think it will even accelerate the normal CFL roster churn very much.
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blue_gold_84
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« Reply #264 on: August 24, 2020, 05:24:22 PM »

I don't understand how any of the players contracts are still legally binding. That's essentially my question.

I'm afraid I don't have an answer. I'm not sure anyone does right now.

I don't think this is necessarily an issue of the contract being legally binding or not; I'm not even remotely familiar with the legality of contracts. My best guess is this opt-out arrangement is something the league and the players have agreed to in light of the 2020 season being cancelled due to the pandemic. I assume most players on multi-year contracts want to have that peace of mind and job stability going forward and the teams want to avoid a chaotic type of free agency situation where all contracts would be effectively null and void. I can't see that working out well at all.

Hopefully, the league can provide more details in the coming days.
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#gotthew

No drought about it.
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Blue In BC
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« Reply #265 on: August 24, 2020, 05:42:33 PM »

I'm afraid I don't have an answer. I'm not sure anyone does right now.

I don't think this is necessarily an issue of the contract being legally binding or not; I'm not even remotely familiar with the legality of contracts. My best guess is this opt-out arrangement is something the league and the players have agreed to in light of the 2020 season being cancelled due to the pandemic. I assume most players on multi-year contracts want to have that peace of mind and job stability going forward and the teams want to avoid a chaotic type of free agency situation where all contracts would be effectively null and void. I can't see that working out well at all.

Hopefully, the league can provide more details in the coming days.

I agree with your thoughts for the most part. We don't know all the details / provisions of the CFLPA and / or the current negotiations. I certainly don't have the answers either but watching as it unfolds is interesting and depressing at the same time.

However, in the normal world: If somebody that has an employment contact and isn't being paid, that's a breach of contract. Not even an NDA or non compete can prevent you from seeking new employment. Law still prevents disclosures that could cause damage to a previous employer.
It doesn't stop you from working for a competitor unless you get a severance package during an exit agreement.

Every employee ( even non management ) have a contact including unions. You have rights of recall if laid off but you also have the right to seek new employment.

All that said, I agree it's not in all players best interests to void contracts extending in 2021 or longer.

For all those with contracts expiring it's a different question. They are still scheduled to be free agents in February.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 05:44:56 PM by Blue In BC » Logged

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the paw
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« Reply #266 on: August 24, 2020, 06:28:13 PM »

The standard player contracts are subordinate to the collective agreement.

By having teams kick in 25% and applying for the benefit, they aren't simply reneging on their commitment.  To get that stipend, and health coverage, the CFLPA agrees not to grieve the issue.  Allowing those with opportunity to catch on somewhere else if they can is just common sense.
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