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Author Topic: "Bogus" Globals  (Read 908 times)
the paw
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« on: January 17, 2020, 03:29:01 PM »

We are all familiar with the phenomenon of American players who qualify as Canadians even though they never set foot in Canada prior to playing in the CFL.  Ben Cahoon is the most famous example, and Alex Singleton being more recent.

Is something similar going on with these Global combines?  I notice that one of the "Swedish" invitees is named William James, and now one of the French players is Tony Anderson.  Are these bona fide Swedish and French players, or are they transplanted/dual citizens from North America who ended up playing in Europe through happenstance?

I don't really care either way, I'm just curious about it. 
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grab grass 'n growl
Blue In BC
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« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2020, 03:47:19 PM »

It's very confusing. I mentioned a player ealier this week that I think we signed ( forgot who at the moment ) that was born in Jamaica. He was classified as an import I suppose he may have had an American parent?

That's the same kind of situation /question as our own Wolitarsky who had a Canadian parent and applied for Canadian citizenship.

So is your status determined by where you're born, what nationality of one or both of your parents were or gaining citizenship?

NOTE: I didn't realize that a person born to a Canadian parent outside of Canada needed to apply for citizenship? I thought that was automatic.
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Throw Long Bannatyne
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« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2020, 05:05:53 PM »

We are all familiar with the phenomenon of American players who qualify as Canadians even though they never set foot in Canada prior to playing in the CFL.  Ben Cahoon is the most famous example, and Alex Singleton being more recent.

Is something similar going on with these Global combines?  I notice that one of the "Swedish" invitees is named William James, and now one of the French players is Tony Anderson.  Are these bona fide Swedish and French players, or are they transplanted/dual citizens from North America who ended up playing in Europe through happenstance?

I don't really care either way, I'm just curious about it. 

Sure hope the CFL gets this definition right to prevent chicanery and close loopholes, there's a whole slew of Nigerian born players in the NFL that could potentially qualify under this ruling if they're careless.  Another question, if a player comes from a country that doesn't have an agreement with the CFL (ie. Nigeria) to participate in this program, will they still qualify as Globals or is it limited to players found in these Combines?  So many questions left wide open to interpretation when the endgame is only vaguely understood.

Frankly I don't think Cahoon or Wolitarsky should qualify as Canadians as they skirt the spirit of the rule.....but that horse left the barn long ago and isn't coming back. 
« Last Edit: January 17, 2020, 05:07:43 PM by Throw Long Bannatyne » Logged
the paw
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« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2020, 05:21:18 PM »

Sure hope the CFL gets this definition right to prevent chicanery and close loopholes, there's a whole slew of Nigerian born players in the NFL that could potentially qualify under this ruling if they're careless.  Another question, if a player comes from a country that doesn't have an agreement with the CFL (ie. Nigeria) to participate in this program, will they still qualify as Globals or is it limited to players found in these Combines?  So many questions left wide open to interpretation when the endgame is only vaguely understood.

Frankly I don't think Cahoon or Wolitarsky should qualify as Canadians as they skirt the spirit of the rule.....but that horse left the barn long ago and isn't coming back. 

3downnation has an article up profiling 15 top guys who went to the French combine.  It looks like half of them attended Canadian or NCAA schools, and a few have already been to NFL mini-camps or workouts.  It just seems like a fairly high number of these guys would be eligible for National or American status, but weren't up to the mark, and are using dual citizenship in France to keep playing after college.

I guess that's okay, I just wonder how strongly French fans would identify with these players as people they root for. That's really the point, trying to get European fans to follow their guys in the CFL. 
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grab grass 'n growl
Sir Blue and Gold
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« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2020, 05:32:18 PM »

The system is full of technicalities. It always has been. Global players are no exception. That's one the of the reasons why the whole system seems antiquated to me. Why we can't be content to watch the best players in the world outside the NFL is beyond me.   
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blue_or_die
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« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2020, 06:02:25 PM »

They have always needed to set very clear rules on what qualifies as Canadian. They have rules I guess, but they are weak and yes, violate the spirit of the rule. The rule should balance time spent/raised in Canada as well as training.
« Last Edit: January 18, 2020, 08:56:42 PM by blue_or_die » Logged

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Fred C Dobbs
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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2020, 11:27:04 PM »



NOTE: I didn't realize that a person born to a Canadian parent outside of Canada needed to apply for citizenship? I thought that was automatic.

I guess it's not automatic but it's essentially unproblematic. Although born and raised in Winnipeg, I lived in the UK from 1970 to 2004. While there I had two sons and registered them as Canadian citizens in case they wanted to come here when they got older. Sure enough they did and, after working up in Iqaluit for the past couple of years, are now here in Winnipeg.
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TecnoGenius
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« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2020, 04:38:30 AM »

Well, if the NAT rules allow Cahoon / Woli / Singleton type IFFYNATs, then one would think they'd apply similar rules to GLOBs and we could have IFFYGLOBs.  That would surely suck if it's just a normal IMP, with NFL tryouts, who gets to be a GLOB in the CFL because his mom has a German passport!  Talk about an unfair advantage to a team that scouts and scores such players!  Basically another American, possibly with pro-level talent, for free on the 2-GLOB AR.

And if that's the case, KW and McManus/Rig need to get on that and make sure the IFFYGLOBs sign in WPG!!

I guess there is one factor that will keep this from getting out of hand: aren't GLOBs mandated ELC?  So a decent-talent IFFYGLOB (really an IMP in disguise) would never accept an ELC, especially if it was written in stone they can never earn more!

What do you do in the case of: parents born in Nigeria, lived in France for 10 years, then moved to Canada and kid went to Canada U.  What the heck is that kid then?  A NAT?  A GLOB?  He'd be both.  Do you write a rule that says players who are both must be one or the other?  Because if he's both then on his first ELC years it would sure pay to label him a GLOB to fill the "free" 2 dressed spots.

It's all so stupid and over-complicated.  It's the CFL.  What next, Ambrosie saying we're renaming to the GFL?  Actually wouldn't surprise me.
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