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Author Topic: CFL Free Agents signing with the AAF?  (Read 5506 times)
bluengold204
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« Reply #15 on: November 27, 2018, 01:34:06 PM »

Add to the list of AAF signings, 
L?Damian Washington and Trent Richardson Birmingham
Khalil Bass Atlanta
Mark Chapman Salt Lake City (Hamilton draft pick)
Sergio Castillo San Antonio

Mostly players who have run out of NFL and CFL options looking to keep the dream alive. Really happy for L'Damian Washington to get another chance. Great story.


Guess Chevelle will never return now.
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GCn18
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« Reply #16 on: November 27, 2018, 01:39:44 PM »

If it makes it to year two, it will be interesting to see how it does alongside the new XFL (which I presume would be playing around the same time).

I enjoy watching football just as much as anyone but you have to wonder if the appetite is there for these startup leagues, especially right after the Super Bowl. I mean, how many of us would watch and/or buy tickets for a new hockey league that went from late June to early September?

For sure. If the Manitoba Moose season started in June does that fuel any extra interest in them. Unlikely. The biggest problem that the AAF will face is that it will undeniably be bad football for the first half of the first season. It is impossible to take 60 fringe football players that are starting from scratch in the chemistry department and get them playing good football after a short TC. Offences will flounder, defences will have constant breakdowns and the product will be unwatchable. Fans will tune out quickly and the league will be dead. With "marquee" names at QB like Alex Ross or L'Damian Washington at receiver does anyone truly think this league will entertain for longer than an American's fleeting interest will allow? I would bet strongly against it. It will be a league of 8 teams that will all play football like the 2014 RedBlacks....if they are lucky.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2018, 01:43:30 PM by GCn18 » Logged

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theaardvark
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« Reply #17 on: November 27, 2018, 02:15:00 PM »

They'e signed 47 quarterbacks...there is a draft today for the QB's...and they have a contract with CBS Sports which will have Kurt Warner hosting the televised draft.
Bill Polian is head hauncho for the league...he's a highly respected football man...
Mike Reiley, Brad Childress, Steve Spurior are a few of the coaches...
If we start losing players like Jovan Santos Knox...that will really affect the quality of football in the CFL
Dave Naylor has said that league GM's are really concerned about finding players.
Being paid in American dollars and closer to home has CFL assistant coaches signing in the AAF...

I'm concerned...to say it's nothing to worry about is to bury your head in the sand.

Which ones?
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bigbuff33
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« Reply #18 on: November 27, 2018, 02:50:31 PM »

Aards...I think you were right...there is an agreement in place to respect each other's contracts.
Dave Naylor, whom I respect a lot, indicated that lots of assistant coaches are heading back down south
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theaardvark
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« Reply #19 on: November 27, 2018, 03:10:42 PM »

Not sure what the break even is for this league, or if that is even a concern, but I can't se it being a star driven league.  Sure, Micheal Vick and Mike Singletary as coaches might bring some interest, but nobody is buying seats or PPV to watch Alex Ross and L'Damian Washington (OK, maybe one fan will, sorry Chevelle Wink )

Flat salaries means no stars.  These will be no-star teams to start, populated with players hoping to get back on the NFL radar.  Or for some, trying to avoid taking a job at Burger King. 

Will they strike gold with a "He hate me" marketing gem?  Will the "nothing else on" syndrome fuel viewership?  Will the sheer power of a Bill Polian or Charlie Ebersol carry the league?  I guess we will see, but I am seeing less and less threat to the CFL...
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Sir Blue and Gold
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« Reply #20 on: November 27, 2018, 03:20:22 PM »

Not sure what the break even is for this league, or if that is even a concern, but I can't se it being a star driven league.  Sure, Micheal Vick and Mike Singletary as coaches might bring some interest, but nobody is buying seats or PPV to watch Alex Ross and L'Damian Washington (OK, maybe one fan will, sorry Chevelle Wink )

Flat salaries means no stars.  These will be no-star teams to start, populated with players hoping to get back on the NFL radar.  Or for some, trying to avoid taking a job at Burger King. 

Will they strike gold with a "He hate me" marketing gem?  Will the "nothing else on" syndrome fuel viewership?  Will the sheer power of a Bill Polian or Charlie Ebersol carry the league?  I guess we will see, but I am seeing less and less threat to the CFL...

Actually, the league has mitigated this problem pretty slyly. Since players sign by region, it ensures that players playing on the teams are already familiar to the audience the team is trying to reach. Chevelle is an example of how incredibly simple but smart that strategy will likely be. Instead of Chevelle having to learn a new game, in a different country and all the roadblocks that come with streaming/viewing games down there, he'll be able to turn on the TV and watch 25+ players he probably recognizes from following college ball. It's smart, it's easy and it could very well work. We only know one Chevelle, but there are a ton of people in the US who love college football and would probably want to keep watching the star players who don't make it to the NFL.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2018, 03:22:42 PM by Sir Blue and Gold » Logged
theaardvark
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« Reply #21 on: November 27, 2018, 03:33:04 PM »

Actually, the league has mitigated this problem pretty slyly. Since players sign by region, it ensures that players playing on the teams are already familiar to the audience the team is trying to reach. Chevelle is an example of how incredibly simple but smart that strategy will likely be. Instead of Chevelle having to learn a new game, in a different country and all the roadblocks that come with streaming/viewing games down there, he'll be able to turn on the TV and watch 25+ players he probably recognizes from following college ball. It's smart, it's easy and it could very well work. We only know one Chevelle, but there are a ton of people in the US who love college football and would probably want to keep watching the star players who don't make it to the NFL.

For sure, it will create some familiarity.  But it will also cause some disparity.  Limiting your pool of players is not always a good thing. 

Will teams be allowed to trade players? 

This will actually make the co-ordinators a lot more important.  Their schemes are going to have to be the star players.  Game planning to have plug and play personnel. 

But it seems that the league really centres around the head coaches...


Ranking the Alliance of American Football Head Coaches
By Jim Weidner -July 12, 2018

The AAF (Alliance of American Football) are steamrolling their way to their opening kickoff on February 9, 2019. The brain trust behind the AAF have officially named the cities and venues each team will be playing in.  They have also named the head coaches who will lead each franchise. With the head coaches now named, it is time to take a look at each coach. Ranking the head coaches of the AAF.
Ranking the Alliance of American Football Head Coaches

When ranking the head coaches of the AAF, LWOS reviewed the background of each coach. Of course, professional head coaching experience played a big part in these rankings. But success at the college level also played a part. Here is how we ranked the AAF head coaches going into their inaugural season


Mike Martz, San Diego

Martz comes in at the top of this AAF head coaches ranking. He made a name for himself as the offensive coordinator, later the head coach, of the St. Louis Rams. That offense, nicknamed ?The Greatest Show on Turf?, helped lead the Rams to a Super Bowl victory in 1999. Because of the offense?s success, Martz was named the head coach when Dick Vermeil stepped away.

As head coach, Martz accumulated a 53-32 regular season record as well a 3-4 playoff record. Besides winning a Super Bowl as their offensive coordinator, he also led the Rams to a Super Bowl appearance in 2001.

Besides his time with the Rams, Martz served as offensive coordinator with Detroit Lions, San Francisco 49ers, and the Chicago Bears.


Steve Spurrier, Orlando

Known as the ?Head Ball Coach,? Spurrier made a name for himself in college football. He was the head coach for Duke University, the University of Florida, and the University of South Carolina. He is well-known for his time with the Gators. Spurrier was in charge of their offense, which earned the nickname ?Fun ?n? Gun? for its high octane passing attack. Under his guidance, he led the Gators to two national championship appearances, winning one of them in 1997. He also tutored quarterback Danny Wuerfell who won the Heisman Trophy that year.

During his time at Duke, Florida, and South Carolina, he achieved a 228-89-2 record.

Spurrier also brings experience as a head coach in the pro ranks. He was the head coach of the Tampa Bay Bandits of the USFL. During his three seasons in charge of the Bandits, he posted a 35-19 regular season record.

He also coached in the NFL with the Washington Redskins. He coached the Redskins for two seasons and posted a 12-20 record.


Brad Childress, Atlanta

Childress was the offensive coordinator for the Philadelphia Eagles from 1999-2005 under then head coach Andy Reid. His time under Reid helped him land the Minnesota Vikings head coaching position.

Childress coached the Vikings from 2006-2010 and registered a 39-25 regular season record. He also had a 1-2 playoff record as well. He helped guide the Vikings to an NFC Championship game appearance in 2009, which they lost to the New Orleans Saints.

The Vikings fired Childress 10 games into the 2010 season. After parting ways in Minnesota, he went on to become the offensive coordinator with the Cleveland Browns in 2012 and was an assistant under Reid with the Kansas City Chiefs from 2013-2017


Mike Riley, San Antonio

Like Spurrier, Riley is known for his work in college football. Riley spent 12 seasons as the head coach of the Oregon State Beavers. Oregon State was a dismal program before Riley arrived in 1997. But he helped engineer a massive turnaround. In his 12 seasons in charge of the Beavers, he posted a 93-80 record and helped lead the Beavers to eight bowl games.

Recently, Riley was the head coach of the University of Nebraska. He was in charge of the Cornhuskers for three seasons and posted a 19-19 record. He also led them to two bowl games, winning one and losing the other.

Although he is known for his time in college, Riley brings a vast amount of professional football experience. He has been a head coach in the NFL (San Diego Chargers), the World League of American Football (San Antonio Riders), and the CFL (Winnipeg Blue Bombers). While in charge of the Blue Bombers, he helped lead them to two Grey Cup Championships.


Rick Neuheisel, Phoenix

Although some might argue that Dennis Erickson should be ahead of Neuheisel in this ranking, we think otherwise. Although Erickson was a successful head coach in college football and has been a head coach in the NFL, he hasn?t posted a winning record since 2007.

Neuheisel has been a head coach at the Colorado, Washington, and UCLA. At those three universities, he posted an 87-59 record. He led his teams to eight bowl appearances posting a 5-3 mark in those games.

He also has spent some time in the NFL as an assistant. He was the Baltimore Ravens quarterbacks coach from 2005-2006 and was the Ravens offensive coordinator in 2007 before taking the UCLA head coaching position.


Dennis Erickson, Salt Lake City

Erickson has a very lengthy resume. He was the head coach at seven different universities (Idaho twice, Wyoming, Washington State, Miami, Oregon State, and Arizona State). His overall record in the college ranks is 179-96-1. He helped lead Miami to two national championships in 1989 and 1991.

He was also the head coach of the Seattle Seahawks and the 49ers. He totaled six seasons between those two teams, achieving a 40-56 regular season record. The Seahawks and 49ers never reached the playoffs under his guidance.


Mike Singletary, Memphis

Singletary was a gridiron legend as a player. The former Chicago Bears stalwart was a warrior playing middle linebacker. His play earned him a spot in Canton, Ohio at the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Singletary was the head coach of the 49ers from 2008-2010. During his three years, he accumulated an 18-22 record. His best season came in 2009 when he led the 49ers to an 8-8 record. The 49ers never made the playoffs during his tenure.

Along with his stay with the 49ers, he was also an assistant for the Ravens, Rams, and Vikings.


Tim Lewis, Birmingham

Lewis is the only person on this list who hasn?t been a head coach at any level.

Lewis was a former first-round pick by the Green Bay Packers back in 1983. He played in four seasons but had a promising career cut short by a neck injury.

Lewis has an extensive background as an assistant in the NFL. Along with being a defensive coordinator for the Pittsburgh Steelers and New York Giants, he was a defensive backs coach for Carolina Panthers, the Seahawks, the Atlanta Falcons, and most recently the 49ers.

Although Lewis might not have as much experience as the others coaches listed here, he is what this league should best represent. He is a coach that is looking for an opportunity and he will get that shot coaching in the AAF.



Not a bad list of coaches, they have to be getting paid...
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bigbuff33
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« Reply #22 on: November 27, 2018, 03:53:34 PM »

Have heard there is big money behind this league.
Impressive group of coaches
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Sir Blue and Gold
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« Reply #23 on: November 27, 2018, 04:07:28 PM »

For sure, it will create some familiarity.  But it will also cause some disparity.  Limiting your pool of players is not always a good thing. 

Will teams be allowed to trade players? 

This will actually make the co-ordinators a lot more important.  Their schemes are going to have to be the star players.  Game planning to have plug and play personnel. 

But it seems that the league really centres around the head coaches...


I'm not sure how trades will work but I'm sure they'll be allowed. What do you mean "the league really centres around the head coaches"? Head coaches play an important role in any football league and that includes the NFL and the CFL. I doubt they'll be the faces of the franchise. They are incredibly recognizable figures that give the league credibility by association. For as much as I like Brad Childress and his work in Philly, for example, I'd still watch to see what he can do with the players he has. As for disparity, every league has disparity. The NFL and the CFL are no exception. The CFL even has some territorial rules (albeit for different reasons). It's why Andrew Harris played most of his career in BC.
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bigbuff33
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« Reply #24 on: November 27, 2018, 04:21:54 PM »

TSN Grey Cup ratings...DOWN 25%...
I barely watched any of it...
The Vikings, Green Bay game got higher ratings in Canada.

This is reality...not being a fear monger...
This league needs an immediate transfusion...Ratings down, attendance down in three major markets, AAF...
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GCn18
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« Reply #25 on: November 27, 2018, 04:23:40 PM »

A league is only as good as the product it puts on the field. While having star coaches will certainly help in recruitment, it won't make any of the players more recognizable to the vast majority of Americans. This league will not survive if it relies on the gates. It needs Ebersol to be able to sell this to the American TV viewing public and the sponsors to be able to survive. In the US there is just too much competition in that sector. The last time Polian attempted this he had the NFL's full financial support and resources...he doesn't have that this time. If this league doesn't immediately play good football the fans who are curious will never tune in again and that will be the first nail in their coffin.

 So many people, equally adept in business and football as Polian have tried time and time again to make this work. It fails because Americans at heart are elitists who will not support a B league.
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GCn18
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« Reply #26 on: November 27, 2018, 04:25:51 PM »

TSN Grey Cup ratings...DOWN 25%...
I barely watched any of it...
The Vikings, Green Bay game got higher ratings in Canada.

This is reality...not being a fear monger...
This league needs an immediate transfusion...Ratings down, attendance down in three major markets, AAF...


The CFL has survived and even prospered when other leagues have been around. It will make life more difficult for our GMs but in all honesty we, the fans of the CFL, will barely notice the difference. Ratings were down because Toronto was in the game last year and although the gate there is poor, they consistently rank among the top teams in viewership. Gates are poor in TO, but a lot of people tune in to watch them.

Every few years a new league pops up and the doomsayers come out, and then that league folds because they, for some odd reason, cannot figure out that Americans don't care about anything but NFL and their regional college alma maters sports programs. Putting 8 teams in 8 backwater locations is not going create any interest by the American population at large. At least the CFL has a country and a 100 years of tradition behind it. Leagues that start from scratch have no built in loyal fan base and that is why ALL the leagues have folded.
« Last Edit: November 27, 2018, 04:33:43 PM by GCn18 » Logged

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theaardvark
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« Reply #27 on: November 27, 2018, 04:50:38 PM »

I'm not sure how trades will work but I'm sure they'll be allowed. What do you mean "the league really centres around the head coaches"? Head coaches play an important role in any football league and that includes the NFL and the CFL. I doubt they'll be the faces of the franchise. They are incredibly recognizable figures that give the league credibility by association. For as much as I like Brad Childress and his work in Philly, for example, I'd still watch to see what he can do with the players he has. As for disparity, every league has disparity. The NFL and the CFL are no exception. The CFL even has some territorial rules (albeit for different reasons). It's why Andrew Harris played most of his career in BC.

From day one, the Ebersol/Polian connection has been marketed.  Once the teams were announced, it was the coaches that were front and centre.  Throwing out names like Singeltary, Childress, Spurier, Riley... that immediately sparked a "hey, maybe this will be legit".  

It is certainly not based on players at all... we know Mark Chapman signed in the AAF... any actually notable names that the general public in the US would know?
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theaardvark
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« Reply #28 on: November 27, 2018, 06:20:46 PM »

It will come down to marketing, having a "hook", and making a game day experience that will get the fans out.

The CFL was a gate oriented league, and the TSN deal changed that somewhat.  I don't think the AAF will be as much gate oriented, but the teams will definitely need gate money if they want black ink.  I wouldn't be surprised if they have a set up the league to break even on TV revenues alone... and let gate cover the stadium costs and profit. 
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blue girl
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« Reply #29 on: November 27, 2018, 07:00:28 PM »

It sounds like a league for players out of college who can't make the NFL. The coaches definitely give it some credibility but I wonder if it will be enough to attract fans.
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