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Author Topic: CFL Must increase the Salary cap!  (Read 6656 times)
pjrocksmb
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This is the CFL- support our league- Go Canada!


« Reply #90 on: February 08, 2018, 01:14:24 AM »

Don't advertise the CFL based on the teams in the US. Base the advertising to the vast amounts of college football fans who probably don't realize that a lot of their favorite alumni are now playing here.

Advertise that former player X from Y college and his Winnipeg Blue Bombers will be taking on playerZ from X university and his BC Lions and you are far more likely to draw in viewers.

Use the players. Most Americans don't realize that a lot of CFL players were US college standouts. Make them aware.

great idea..... but a media campaign in the USA wouldn't give a solid return on investment.  It would cost much more than it would bring in.  The CFL isn't rich and never will be.  Just not enough teams / fans to power it like other sports leagues.  Better value on marketing in Canada where the fans go to games, watch it on TV and buy merch.  Acquiring more American fans via a media campaign is a great idea but the expense it would cost isn't feasible.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 01:16:38 AM by pjrocksmb » Logged

I don't watch the No Fun League b/c I live in Canada and love the CFL
66 Chevelle
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« Reply #91 on: February 08, 2018, 01:47:29 AM »

How do you suggest they do that more than it's already been done? There is an agreement in place with ESPN as you know. The CFL likely isn't going to spend a lot of money, nor does it likely have a lot of money, to go on a prolonged advertising campaign throughout the US. Do you really think most Americans would tune in to watch the Winnipeg Blue Bombers and BC Lions on a Friday night on a regular basis? I just can't see it. The rule differences work against the game down there too. I just can't see the average American buying into the league which is what it would take for it to be successful. To use an rough analogy that those in Canada could relate too, that would sort of be like the KHL advertising itself to the hockey-crazed fans in Canada and wondering why it's not working (for the vast majority).

wanted to give this some thought...

let's say that the CFL and NBC were to partner, the CFL wouldn't have to have a marketing budget because NBC would promote the CFL on there channel, and other NBC owned channels, as it is in their best interest. All the CFL has to do in this scenario would be able to put on games.  There is even opportunity when partnering with this type of sports channel for the CFL to produce additional programming that could be sold to the network as well. In fact, the NBC sports channel could be a good partner as they already carry hockey.  As for the rest of their 'bang up' programming, they carry soccer, rugby, formula one, Ivy League college football, and Notre Dame football, and seasonal Olympic coverage. Tell me that they would not be interested in the CFL.

As far as the CFL line up, I think it is entirely possible for the US viewing audience to be perfectly fine with it. I don't know if you know how the NFL coverage works here, so if you'll indulge me... Living in Missouri, each Sunday I get 4 games, 2 NFC and 2 AFC games. For the AFC games, 1 will be the Chiefs and the other could be anyone, actually. For the NFC games, when the Rams were in St. Louis, we'd get their game and 1 other NFC game. There would be an early and late game and on opposing channels. So basically, I watch the Chiefs and 1 of the other 2, which ever interests me more. Then there is the Sunday night game, Monday night game, and at times a Thursday night game on the NFL channel. All of these games are national games and could be anything.  So, with 32 teams, you get your local market team(s) and then national games.  I tell you this because the way the CFL is currently, all teams would basically become 'local market teams' because we'd be able to see the team of our choice each week, just like I do the Chiefs. There's a chance, though slight, that I may not see a Lions game at all during a season unless they make the playoffs. As of now, if my only option is to watch a Bills/Jets game, I would if that was all that's on, but I wouldn't be excited because it was on.

So, the US viewing public could pick a CFL team as 'their' team and have the advantage of having access to every game that team plays. And again, the CFL starts 3 months earlier than NCAA and NFL so you're 'fishing in a barrel' so to speak. The small league also plays into the favor of the CFL because as a new option it seems more 'manageable' from the stand point of team identification and keeping up with the action as it mirrors a NCAA college conference that has 2 divisions. For example, the SEC, they have 14 teams divided into 2 division. This is the conference my Tigers play in so I watch all the SEC games as first option and follow the SEC more closely than say the PAC 12.

So, the CFL gets the best of both worlds, so to speak. The label of being a 'pro' football team that will have all of the college players coming from the NCAA, like the NFL, and the smaller, cozy size of a NCAA conference. So, in my opinion, it limitations that some may think the CFL has will actually work in the CFL's favor. Because there is 32 teams in the NFL and 120 Div I teams, the current fan now will generally break it down to their favorite team and their conference or division and that is what they will follow religiously. And for example, I would watch the other CFL games last year if I was home, which was most of the time, because it was easy to do.

Again, using me as an example, I didn't know that the rules were different prior to watching my first CFL game. I did know that the field was bigger but that was pretty much where it ended. But as I've said before, the rules in the CFL make sense, one to the other, so it's easier to follow and understand.  I had no idea that CFL was 3 down football, didn't take long to learn that it was though. But, when watching the first time it's not like you have to take a test in order to view, so, you get acclimated to the differences as they happen. And since the differences seem to fit the overall game and the differences as a collective, it's not hard to follow or pick up on. Except the kicking, I still don't understand it all, like a field goal miss and the receiving team kicking it back... but whatever, lol. Plus, NFL fans are generally NCAA fans as well and the two of them have several different rules and penalties as well already, so, we're use to switching gears back and forth. So, there are already things about each of those games I prefer over the other but at the end of the day it doesn't actually impact my enjoyment of watching either.

I know that their have been efforts to do 'stuff' in the past, some with limited success and others with little to no success. But I would be the first to say this, it would be foolish to try and bring the game to the US again as it would not be any more successful here now, than it was before. So you ask, then why would we watch it. The difference is that if you attempted to expand here in the US with actual team placement, a) that would take a lot of money, b) prime markets are already full with generally a pro baseball, basketball, hockey, and or football team already and would be doomed from the start to create a new fan base. The type of thing requires commitment on the part of 1,000's of people for it to succeed and once fans hear of the 'struggling' teams they assume the worse and won't tune in. However, to simply watch games all I have to do is turn on the TV, something I'm already doing now and cost me nothing. With the current teams in the CFL you don't see a struggling league, quite the opposite. It's made of quality players that put on an even better show. Do you think we get games like the one where the Bombers came back from 3 scores down with 1:41 left in the game here in the NFL?  Hell no we don't...

In closing, you all should have to be the ones selling me on the game, not the other way around. If a fan of the NFL, that has been watching NFL games for 40+ years has become this big of fan in less than a year, you'd have to believe that it is entirely possible for others to do the same. Because one of the biggest selling points is you don't have to compete with an existing product, not the NFL or the NCAA. You get a 3 month head start of exclusive meaningful games for the football fan.

Today was national signing day for the NCAA, I've been tracking recruits all day as my football activity for the day... me and 100,000's others... my TV in my office is on the NFL channel all day, most days, even if I'm not watching it, I'm listening to it... I think you guys may undervalue your game just a little, or have been told for so long by the uninformed that it's lesser and you've began to believe it... but's if that's the case, it's not true... from top to bottom the teams are a lot more equal in talent therefore making for more interesting games. When watching games, you don't notice any difference of any size between the talent on the field as opposed to the NFL and is a notch above your NCAA play.

I don't know, I love the CFL and all it's made up of...  The only thing I would like to see happen down the road is to obtain the financial stability to be able to pay players better so that the CFL core player is different than the NFL player and players could sign longer contracts for decent pay and only the occasional loss of a player to the NFL as opposed to now and the worry that all of our good players are headed to the NFL. And I think that's possible. Not everyone would feel like they need to be in the NFL when the payday separates them from let's say, having to have a second job to make it... For some, it's not all about the money, they'd play forever is they made $125,000 a year... even forgo the NFL dream if that dream limits them to a NFL practice squad...
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just because you can doesn't mean you should...
pjrocksmb
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This is the CFL- support our league- Go Canada!


« Reply #92 on: February 08, 2018, 01:53:09 AM »

wanted to give this some thought...

let's say that the CFL and NBC were to partner, the CFL wouldn't have to have a marketing budget because NBC would promote the CFL on there channel, and other NBC owned channels, as it is in their best interest. All the CFL has to do in this scenario would be able to put on games.  There is even opportunity when partnering with this type of sports channel for the CFL to produce additional programming that could be sold to the network as well. In fact, the NBC sports channel could be a good partner as they already carry hockey.  As for the rest of their 'bang up' programming, they carry soccer, rugby, formula one, Ivy League college football, and Notre Dame football, and seasonal Olympic coverage. Tell me that they would not be interested in the CFL.

As far as the CFL line up, I think it is entirely possible for the US viewing audience to be perfectly fine with it. I don't know if you know how the NFL coverage works here, so if you'll indulge me... Living in Missouri, each Sunday I get 4 games, 2 NFC and 2 AFC games. For the AFC games, 1 will be the Chiefs and the other could be anyone, actually. For the NFC games, when the Rams were in St. Louis, we'd get their game and 1 other NFC game. There would be an early and late game and on opposing channels. So basically, I watch the Chiefs and 1 of the other 2, which ever interests me more. Then there is the Sunday night game, Monday night game, and at times a Thursday night game on the NFL channel. All of these games are national games and could be anything.  So, with 32 teams, you get your local market team(s) and then national games.  I tell you this because the way the CFL is currently, all teams would basically become 'local market teams' because we'd be able to see the team of our choice each week, just like I do the Chiefs. There's a chance, though slight, that I may not see a Lions game at all during a season unless they make the playoffs. As of now, if my only option is to watch a Bills/Jets game, I would if that was all that's on, but I wouldn't be excited because it was on.

So, the US viewing public could pick a CFL team as 'their' team and have the advantage of having access to every game that team plays. And again, the CFL starts 3 months earlier than NCAA and NFL so you're 'fishing in a barrel' so to speak. The small league also plays into the favor of the CFL because as a new option it seems more 'manageable' from the stand point of team identification and keeping up with the action as it mirrors a NCAA college conference that has 2 divisions. For example, the SEC, they have 14 teams divided into 2 division. This is the conference my Tigers play in so I watch all the SEC games as first option and follow the SEC more closely than say the PAC 12.

So, the CFL gets the best of both worlds, so to speak. The label of being a 'pro' football team that will have all of the college players coming from the NCAA, like the NFL, and the smaller, cozy size of a NCAA conference. So, in my opinion, it limitations that some may think the CFL has will actually work in the CFL's favor. Because there is 32 teams in the NFL and 120 Div I teams, the current fan now will generally break it down to their favorite team and their conference or division and that is what they will follow religiously. And for example, I would watch the other CFL games last year if I was home, which was most of the time, because it was easy to do.

Again, using me as an example, I didn't know that the rules were different prior to watching my first CFL game. I did know that the field was bigger but that was pretty much where it ended. But as I've said before, the rules in the CFL make sense, one to the other, so it's easier to follow and understand.  I had no idea that CFL was 3 down football, didn't take long to learn that it was though. But, when watching the first time it's not like you have to take a test in order to view, so, you get acclimated to the differences as they happen. And since the differences seem to fit the overall game and the differences as a collective, it's not hard to follow or pick up on. Except the kicking, I still don't understand it all, like a field goal miss and the receiving team kicking it back... but whatever, lol. Plus, NFL fans are generally NCAA fans as well and the two of them have several different rules and penalties as well already, so, we're use to switching gears back and forth. So, there are already things about each of those games I prefer over the other but at the end of the day it doesn't actually impact my enjoyment of watching either.

I know that their have been efforts to do 'stuff' in the past, some with limited success and others with little to no success. But I would be the first to say this, it would be foolish to try and bring the game to the US again as it would not be any more successful here now, than it was before. So you ask, then why would we watch it. The difference is that if you attempted to expand here in the US with actual team placement, a) that would take a lot of money, b) prime markets are already full with generally a pro baseball, basketball, hockey, and or football team already and would be doomed from the start to create a new fan base. The type of thing requires commitment on the part of 1,000's of people for it to succeed and once fans hear of the 'struggling' teams they assume the worse and won't tune in. However, to simply watch games all I have to do is turn on the TV, something I'm already doing now and cost me nothing. With the current teams in the CFL you don't see a struggling league, quite the opposite. It's made of quality players that put on an even better show. Do you think we get games like the one where the Bombers came back from 3 scores down with 1:41 left in the game here in the NFL?  Hell no we don't...

In closing, you all should have to be the ones selling me on the game, not the other way around. If a fan of the NFL, that has been watching NFL games for 40+ years has become this big of fan in less than a year, you'd have to believe that it is entirely possible for others to do the same. Because one of the biggest selling points is you don't have to compete with an existing product, not the NFL or the NCAA. You get a 3 month head start of exclusive meaningful games for the football fan.

Today was national signing day for the NCAA, I've been tracking recruits all day as my football activity for the day... me and 100,000's others... my TV in my office is on the NFL channel all day, most days, even if I'm not watching it, I'm listening to it... I think you guys may undervalue your game just a little, or have been told for so long by the uninformed that it's lesser and you've began to believe it... but's if that's the case, it's not true... from top to bottom the teams are a lot more equal in talent therefore making for more interesting games. When watching games, you don't notice any difference of any size between the talent on the field as opposed to the NFL and is a notch above your NCAA play.

I don't know, I love the CFL and all it's made up of...  The only thing I would like to see happen down the road is to obtain the financial stability to be able to pay players better so that the CFL core player is different than the NFL player and players could sign longer contracts for decent pay and only the occasional loss of a player to the NFL as opposed to now and the worry that all of our good players are headed to the NFL. And I think that's possible. Not everyone would feel like they need to be in the NFL when the payday separates them from let's say, having to have a second job to make it... For some, it's not all about the money, they'd play forever is they made $125,000 a year... even forgo the NFL dream if that dream limits them to a NFL practice squad...

In Canada hockey is #1 and the NFL and college ball also draw endless amounts of Canadian fans money and time.  What the CFL is fighting with at the moment is the crazy fixation on the biggest pro sport athletes.  They are celebrities more than anything.  While the CFL has it's share of stars it's nothing like the star power of any of the major leagues.  The world is run on the masses watching what the rich and famous do.  Hard to beat that trend.  I am happy having the CFL being small, affordable and real.  Don't need the big bucks or mega stars.  While I want the league to grow, it's pretty darn good the way is it.
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I don't watch the No Fun League b/c I live in Canada and love the CFL
66 Chevelle
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« Reply #93 on: February 08, 2018, 01:56:42 AM »

great idea..... but a media campaign in the USA wouldn't give a solid return on investment.  It would cost much more than it would bring in.  The CFL isn't rich and never will be.  Just not enough teams / fans to power it like other sports leagues.  Better value on marketing in Canada where the fans go to games, watch it on TV and buy merch.  Acquiring more American fans via a media campaign is a great idea but the expense it would cost isn't feasible.

for the short answer, the CFL wouldn't have to market it or fund the marketing, their partner, the network, shoulders all of that expense, not the CFL...
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jeremy q public
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« Reply #94 on: February 08, 2018, 07:43:33 AM »

The reasons for raising the salary cap are (a) moral and (b) related to attracting and retaining a higher caliber of player. 

The economics suggest that unless there is a significant growth in revenue from a new stream, the possible cap growth is not likely going to be large enough to significantly impact (b).  I don't think substantial increases in ticket prices are even on the table, and haven't really been suggested in this thread. 

So that leaves us with the notion that we should compensate the lower end of the salary spectrum a bit better to at least symbolically acknowledge how these guys beat themselves up for our entertainment.  Alternatives to simply increasing the salary cap would be to use revenue gains to improve pensions and/or provide better health care for injured players.  Neither of those would necessarily break the bank. 

The other issue is whether in fact the revenues have to come first, given the CBA is a multi-year agreement.  I think it would be possible to tie salary cap increases to growth in revenue on a contingent formula.  In other words make the agreement that if and when revenues grow, this proportion will be dedicated to player compensation.  If I was bargaining for the CFLPA, that would be my strategy. 

Your point b just basically rehashed my comment. It?s not gonna work.

Thanks for explaining point A. I?m all for moral thinking when it comes to running a business but I just don?t feel that bad for these guys who get to live out my childhood dream. They?re getting paid a healthy wage to play a game. I agree with tying SMS to revenue but I see no reason for the league to make symbolic gestures about player health. I?d rather they do a better job of protecting player health, which can cost money in itself.
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Sir Blue and Gold
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« Reply #95 on: February 08, 2018, 01:55:44 PM »

wanted to give this some thought...

let's say that the CFL and NBC were to partner, the CFL wouldn't have to have a marketing budget because NBC would promote the CFL on there channel, and other NBC owned channels, as it is in their best interest. All the CFL has to do in this scenario would be able to put on games.  There is even opportunity when partnering with this type of sports channel for the CFL to produce additional programming that could be sold to the network as well. In fact, the NBC sports channel could be a good partner as they already carry hockey.  As for the rest of their 'bang up' programming, they carry soccer, rugby, formula one, Ivy League college football, and Notre Dame football, and seasonal Olympic coverage. Tell me that they would not be interested in the CFL.

As far as the CFL line up, I think it is entirely possible for the US viewing audience to be perfectly fine with it. I don't know if you know how the NFL coverage works here, so if you'll indulge me... Living in Missouri, each Sunday I get 4 games, 2 NFC and 2 AFC games. For the AFC games, 1 will be the Chiefs and the other could be anyone, actually. For the NFC games, when the Rams were in St. Louis, we'd get their game and 1 other NFC game. There would be an early and late game and on opposing channels. So basically, I watch the Chiefs and 1 of the other 2, which ever interests me more. Then there is the Sunday night game, Monday night game, and at times a Thursday night game on the NFL channel. All of these games are national games and could be anything.  So, with 32 teams, you get your local market team(s) and then national games.  I tell you this because the way the CFL is currently, all teams would basically become 'local market teams' because we'd be able to see the team of our choice each week, just like I do the Chiefs. There's a chance, though slight, that I may not see a Lions game at all during a season unless they make the playoffs. As of now, if my only option is to watch a Bills/Jets game, I would if that was all that's on, but I wouldn't be excited because it was on.

So, the US viewing public could pick a CFL team as 'their' team and have the advantage of having access to every game that team plays. And again, the CFL starts 3 months earlier than NCAA and NFL so you're 'fishing in a barrel' so to speak. The small league also plays into the favor of the CFL because as a new option it seems more 'manageable' from the stand point of team identification and keeping up with the action as it mirrors a NCAA college conference that has 2 divisions. For example, the SEC, they have 14 teams divided into 2 division. This is the conference my Tigers play in so I watch all the SEC games as first option and follow the SEC more closely than say the PAC 12.

So, the CFL gets the best of both worlds, so to speak. The label of being a 'pro' football team that will have all of the college players coming from the NCAA, like the NFL, and the smaller, cozy size of a NCAA conference. So, in my opinion, it limitations that some may think the CFL has will actually work in the CFL's favor. Because there is 32 teams in the NFL and 120 Div I teams, the current fan now will generally break it down to their favorite team and their conference or division and that is what they will follow religiously. And for example, I would watch the other CFL games last year if I was home, which was most of the time, because it was easy to do.

Again, using me as an example, I didn't know that the rules were different prior to watching my first CFL game. I did know that the field was bigger but that was pretty much where it ended. But as I've said before, the rules in the CFL make sense, one to the other, so it's easier to follow and understand.  I had no idea that CFL was 3 down football, didn't take long to learn that it was though. But, when watching the first time it's not like you have to take a test in order to view, so, you get acclimated to the differences as they happen. And since the differences seem to fit the overall game and the differences as a collective, it's not hard to follow or pick up on. Except the kicking, I still don't understand it all, like a field goal miss and the receiving team kicking it back... but whatever, lol. Plus, NFL fans are generally NCAA fans as well and the two of them have several different rules and penalties as well already, so, we're use to switching gears back and forth. So, there are already things about each of those games I prefer over the other but at the end of the day it doesn't actually impact my enjoyment of watching either.

I know that their have been efforts to do 'stuff' in the past, some with limited success and others with little to no success. But I would be the first to say this, it would be foolish to try and bring the game to the US again as it would not be any more successful here now, than it was before. So you ask, then why would we watch it. The difference is that if you attempted to expand here in the US with actual team placement, a) that would take a lot of money, b) prime markets are already full with generally a pro baseball, basketball, hockey, and or football team already and would be doomed from the start to create a new fan base. The type of thing requires commitment on the part of 1,000's of people for it to succeed and once fans hear of the 'struggling' teams they assume the worse and won't tune in. However, to simply watch games all I have to do is turn on the TV, something I'm already doing now and cost me nothing. With the current teams in the CFL you don't see a struggling league, quite the opposite. It's made of quality players that put on an even better show. Do you think we get games like the one where the Bombers came back from 3 scores down with 1:41 left in the game here in the NFL?  Hell no we don't...

In closing, you all should have to be the ones selling me on the game, not the other way around. If a fan of the NFL, that has been watching NFL games for 40+ years has become this big of fan in less than a year, you'd have to believe that it is entirely possible for others to do the same. Because one of the biggest selling points is you don't have to compete with an existing product, not the NFL or the NCAA. You get a 3 month head start of exclusive meaningful games for the football fan.

Today was national signing day for the NCAA, I've been tracking recruits all day as my football activity for the day... me and 100,000's others... my TV in my office is on the NFL channel all day, most days, even if I'm not watching it, I'm listening to it... I think you guys may undervalue your game just a little, or have been told for so long by the uninformed that it's lesser and you've began to believe it... but's if that's the case, it's not true... from top to bottom the teams are a lot more equal in talent therefore making for more interesting games. When watching games, you don't notice any difference of any size between the talent on the field as opposed to the NFL and is a notch above your NCAA play.

I don't know, I love the CFL and all it's made up of...  The only thing I would like to see happen down the road is to obtain the financial stability to be able to pay players better so that the CFL core player is different than the NFL player and players could sign longer contracts for decent pay and only the occasional loss of a player to the NFL as opposed to now and the worry that all of our good players are headed to the NFL. And I think that's possible. Not everyone would feel like they need to be in the NFL when the payday separates them from let's say, having to have a second job to make it... For some, it's not all about the money, they'd play forever is they made $125,000 a year... even forgo the NFL dream if that dream limits them to a NFL practice squad...

Good points. I guess you'd be a better judge than me, but I think for a sports league to be successful the biggest thing it needs is credibility. Do you think the CFL could ever be credible in the US? Would an American football fan from Texas ever agree with (or tolerate) the ratio rules dictating a number of Canadians? How would the average US fan view the widely different production values between the CFL and NFL/NCAA? How could we get them to care about a Grey Cup or cheer for a specific team without any teams in US markets? I think it would be astronomically hard and cost exorbitant money to even have a shot.

I think the CFL's best hope is to continue down a path of partnership with the NFL and find some sort of solution/agreement that the two leagues might be able to work together in some capacities. For example, many CFL fans would loathe to have the CFL become some sort of farm league for the NFL but a system like that would solve the credibility problem the league has down south and would possibly allow the NFL to write some cheques that the CFL could absolutely use. I'm not sure the terms, but that's the only way I see something working down south and I'm not sure what the CFL could offer the NFL (that it doesn't already) to get a deal. Maybe the NFL would just see value in supporting another country being interested in football and having a functional league? I don't really know - and believe me some CFL purists would hate the idea, but I would go for it if it meant a large boost to funding year-over-year and the NFL's committment to the CFL's rules and traditions.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 01:57:31 PM by Sir Blue and Gold » Logged
66 Chevelle
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« Reply #96 on: February 08, 2018, 02:27:02 PM »

Good points. I guess you'd be a better judge than me, but I think for a sports league to be successful the biggest thing it needs is credibility. Do you think the CFL could ever be credible in the US? Would an American football fan from Texas ever agree with (or tolerate) the ratio rules dictating a number of Canadians? How would the average US fan view the widely different production values between the CFL and NFL/NCAA? How could we get them to care about a Grey Cup or cheer for a specific team without any teams in US markets? I think it would be astronomically hard and cost exorbitant money to even have a shot.

I think the CFL's best hope is to continue down a path of partnership with the NFL and find some sort of solution/agreement that the two leagues might be able to work together in some capacities. For example, many CFL fans would loathe to have the CFL become some sort of farm league for the NFL but a system like that would solve the credibility problem the league has down south and would possibly allow the NFL to write some cheques that the CFL could absolutely use. I'm not sure the terms, but that's the only way I see something working down south and I'm not sure what the CFL could offer the NFL (that it doesn't already) to get a deal. Maybe the NFL would just see value in supporting another country being interested in football and having a functional league? I don't really know - and believe me some CFL purists would hate the idea, but I would go for it if it meant a large boost to funding year-over-year and the NFL's committment to the CFL's rules and traditions.

here's the way I see it... if you told me there are 30 fans and I had to convert half of them to make it viable, I would probably be beat. However, there is something like 40,000,000 fans and all we have to reach is less than 20,000th of 1 percent of them.  That's a number I can work with... You will run into the die hards that will have a fit and claim it's not football, we don't want them anyway, lol. Then you'll have a portion that is the elder fans, who will claim they've seen it before and they aren't interested. However, most will be too lazy to investigate the differences before hand, and quite honestly, there's no need to tell them there is a difference until you have them watching a game. By this time I've hyped myself up for some football and figure 'what the heck', I'll give it a try. Then, when you actually watch the game you find yourself not really noticing the differences because the game flows without any weird things going on.

I don't like the idea of having the NFL involved because I wouldn't want the impression that it's a lesser game, which would be hard to keep from happening. However, it may be what it takes to get things rolling because I like the idea of the NFL subsidizing the cost. What if an NFL team, or multiple teams, could have an association with a specific CFL team that they could 'park' there young players with that CFL team and have them be able to play live games with live game action in an effort to develop their talent yet be able to retain it at the same time? This could be newly drafted players or young players but during this time the NFL team would pay the CFL for the 'help'.

The NFL channel is a logical spot as well, they have a vested interest to keep football in front of and available to their fan base. As we've talked about, NFL viewership has been slipping, no where near the panic type of slipping, but this could create and keep interest up in their product as well.

The thing that nationwide providers brings to the table that wasn't available years ago is that actual distribution is a lot easier now. Essentially, all you have to do is get one of the large providers to agree to carry the product, because if one has it the other will want it, and you instantly have nationwide coverage and exposure. And since they purchase the rights they are responsible for advertising and promoting the product. All the CFL has to do is provide the product. So they have a large vested interest in making it be successful. Where as before you would have to go to every market and convince a local provider to take programming, yada, yada, yada.... time consuming and expensive for the CFL...

I'm not sure what the right answer is, but I do believe that now is the time to start looking into it. If the XFL does indeed take off they can step and take the spot and the CFL could be the odd man out, so to speak. And if nothing else, it really doesn't cost either party anything to make a few calls and see if there is any interest.
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66 Chevelle
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« Reply #97 on: February 08, 2018, 03:14:04 PM »

Good points. I guess you'd be a better judge than me, but I think for a sports league to be successful the biggest thing it needs is credibility. Do you think the CFL could ever be credible in the US? Would an American football fan from Texas ever agree with (or tolerate) the ratio rules dictating a number of Canadians? How would the average US fan view the widely different production values between the CFL and NFL/NCAA? How could we get them to care about a Grey Cup or cheer for a specific team without any teams in US markets? I think it would be astronomically hard and cost exorbitant money to even have a shot.


you should know this as well as any one, lol....  How many times early on did you have to post 'dude, you really don't understand the Canadian football game' because I didn't notice all that was going on right in front of my eyes, lol...  subtle, it's really subtle... didn't stop me from watching and thinking I knew what was happening, lol..
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bomb squad
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« Reply #98 on: February 08, 2018, 06:05:52 PM »

wanted to give this some thought...

let's say that the CFL and NBC were to partner, the CFL wouldn't have to have a marketing budget because NBC would promote the CFL on there channel, and other NBC owned channels, as it is in their best interest. All the CFL has to do in this scenario would be able to put on games.  There is even opportunity when partnering with this type of sports channel for the CFL to produce additional programming that could be sold to the network as well. In fact, the NBC sports channel could be a good partner as they already carry hockey.  As for the rest of their 'bang up' programming, they carry soccer, rugby, formula one, Ivy League college football, and Notre Dame football, and seasonal Olympic coverage. Tell me that they would not be interested in the CFL.

As far as the CFL line up, I think it is entirely possible for the US viewing audience to be perfectly fine with it. I don't know if you know how the NFL coverage works here, so if you'll indulge me... Living in Missouri, each Sunday I get 4 games, 2 NFC and 2 AFC games. For the AFC games, 1 will be the Chiefs and the other could be anyone, actually. For the NFC games, when the Rams were in St. Louis, we'd get their game and 1 other NFC game. There would be an early and late game and on opposing channels. So basically, I watch the Chiefs and 1 of the other 2, which ever interests me more. Then there is the Sunday night game, Monday night game, and at times a Thursday night game on the NFL channel. All of these games are national games and could be anything.  So, with 32 teams, you get your local market team(s) and then national games.  I tell you this because the way the CFL is currently, all teams would basically become 'local market teams' because we'd be able to see the team of our choice each week, just like I do the Chiefs. There's a chance, though slight, that I may not see a Lions game at all during a season unless they make the playoffs. As of now, if my only option is to watch a Bills/Jets game, I would if that was all that's on, but I wouldn't be excited because it was on.

So, the US viewing public could pick a CFL team as 'their' team and have the advantage of having access to every game that team plays. And again, the CFL starts 3 months earlier than NCAA and NFL so you're 'fishing in a barrel' so to speak. The small league also plays into the favor of the CFL because as a new option it seems more 'manageable' from the stand point of team identification and keeping up with the action as it mirrors a NCAA college conference that has 2 divisions. For example, the SEC, they have 14 teams divided into 2 division. This is the conference my Tigers play in so I watch all the SEC games as first option and follow the SEC more closely than say the PAC 12.

So, the CFL gets the best of both worlds, so to speak. The label of being a 'pro' football team that will have all of the college players coming from the NCAA, like the NFL, and the smaller, cozy size of a NCAA conference. So, in my opinion, it limitations that some may think the CFL has will actually work in the CFL's favor. Because there is 32 teams in the NFL and 120 Div I teams, the current fan now will generally break it down to their favorite team and their conference or division and that is what they will follow religiously. And for example, I would watch the other CFL games last year if I was home, which was most of the time, because it was easy to do.

Again, using me as an example, I didn't know that the rules were different prior to watching my first CFL game. I did know that the field was bigger but that was pretty much where it ended. But as I've said before, the rules in the CFL make sense, one to the other, so it's easier to follow and understand.  I had no idea that CFL was 3 down football, didn't take long to learn that it was though. But, when watching the first time it's not like you have to take a test in order to view, so, you get acclimated to the differences as they happen. And since the differences seem to fit the overall game and the differences as a collective, it's not hard to follow or pick up on. Except the kicking, I still don't understand it all, like a field goal miss and the receiving team kicking it back... but whatever, lol. Plus, NFL fans are generally NCAA fans as well and the two of them have several different rules and penalties as well already, so, we're use to switching gears back and forth. So, there are already things about each of those games I prefer over the other but at the end of the day it doesn't actually impact my enjoyment of watching either.

I know that their have been efforts to do 'stuff' in the past, some with limited success and others with little to no success. But I would be the first to say this, it would be foolish to try and bring the game to the US again as it would not be any more successful here now, than it was before. So you ask, then why would we watch it. The difference is that if you attempted to expand here in the US with actual team placement, a) that would take a lot of money, b) prime markets are already full with generally a pro baseball, basketball, hockey, and or football team already and would be doomed from the start to create a new fan base. The type of thing requires commitment on the part of 1,000's of people for it to succeed and once fans hear of the 'struggling' teams they assume the worse and won't tune in. However, to simply watch games all I have to do is turn on the TV, something I'm already doing now and cost me nothing. With the current teams in the CFL you don't see a struggling league, quite the opposite. It's made of quality players that put on an even better show. Do you think we get games like the one where the Bombers came back from 3 scores down with 1:41 left in the game here in the NFL?  Hell no we don't...

In closing, you all should have to be the ones selling me on the game, not the other way around. If a fan of the NFL, that has been watching NFL games for 40+ years has become this big of fan in less than a year, you'd have to believe that it is entirely possible for others to do the same. Because one of the biggest selling points is you don't have to compete with an existing product, not the NFL or the NCAA. You get a 3 month head start of exclusive meaningful games for the football fan.

Today was national signing day for the NCAA, I've been tracking recruits all day as my football activity for the day... me and 100,000's others... my TV in my office is on the NFL channel all day, most days, even if I'm not watching it, I'm listening to it... I think you guys may undervalue your game just a little, or have been told for so long by the uninformed that it's lesser and you've began to believe it... but's if that's the case, it's not true... from top to bottom the teams are a lot more equal in talent therefore making for more interesting games. When watching games, you don't notice any difference of any size between the talent on the field as opposed to the NFL and is a notch above your NCAA play.

I don't know, I love the CFL and all it's made up of...  The only thing I would like to see happen down the road is to obtain the financial stability to be able to pay players better so that the CFL core player is different than the NFL player and players could sign longer contracts for decent pay and only the occasional loss of a player to the NFL as opposed to now and the worry that all of our good players are headed to the NFL. And I think that's possible. Not everyone would feel like they need to be in the NFL when the payday separates them from let's say, having to have a second job to make it... For some, it's not all about the money, they'd play forever is they made $125,000 a year... even forgo the NFL dream if that dream limits them to a NFL practice squad...

Good stuff, just the bolded part I don't get. Seems to me your already sold on the game and them some. Your assessment of our game and our players is bang on. Any idea to grow the game south of the border is worth serious consideration.  The potential is there and there's so much upside. Your absolutely right, why couldn't there be many, many more you's in USA? It just takes vision, belief, and a lot of effort to make it happen.

Perhaps there's somebody on the inside who could make it happen. You know, an American living in the States who watches the game, gets the game, and understands why so many Canadians are so passionate about it. Somebody who has business acumen, is set, and has a dream and a vision for it down south. Somebody like, ah, well, like you...
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Throw Long Bannatyne
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« Reply #99 on: February 08, 2018, 07:14:44 PM »

Good stuff, just the bolded part I don't get. Seems to me your already sold on the game and them some. Your assessment of our game and our players is bang on. Any idea to grow the game south of the border is worth serious consideration.  The potential is there and there's so much upside. Your absolutely right, why couldn't there be many, many more you's in USA? It just takes vision, belief, and a lot of effort to make it happen.

Perhaps there's somebody on the inside who could make it happen. You know, an American living in the States who watches the game, gets the game, and understands why so many Canadians are so passionate about it. Somebody who has business acumen, is set, and has a dream and a vision for it down south. Somebody like, ah, well, like you...

This would have to happen at the league and network level, it's not a rinky-dink job for a Fuller Brush salesman.
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66 Chevelle
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« Reply #100 on: February 09, 2018, 01:46:21 AM »

Good stuff, just the bolded part I don't get. Seems to me your already sold on the game and them some. Your assessment of our game and our players is bang on. Any idea to grow the game south of the border is worth serious consideration.  The potential is there and there's so much upside. Your absolutely right, why couldn't there be many, many more you's in USA? It just takes vision, belief, and a lot of effort to make it happen.

Perhaps there's somebody on the inside who could make it happen. You know, an American living in the States who watches the game, gets the game, and understands why so many Canadians are so passionate about it. Somebody who has business acumen, is set, and has a dream and a vision for it down south. Somebody like, ah, well, like you...


the bold part was related to me feeling like I had to sell how good and marketable the CFL game is to some around here when you would think it would have been them trying to sell me on the idea... just a little poke of fun...

But thanks for the vote of confidence, part of what I've done in my career was process improvement and automation thru strategic partnerships with those in the private sector and the development of hardware/software applications and their implementation...  maybe I'll send the CFL a resume, lol...
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66 Chevelle
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« Reply #101 on: February 09, 2018, 01:47:00 AM »

This would have to happen at the league and network level, it's not a rinky-dink job for a Fuller Brush salesman.

surely you aren't referring to me...
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Throw Long Bannatyne
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« Reply #102 on: February 09, 2018, 02:26:13 AM »

surely you aren't referring to me...

No, I was using an analogy.  Unless you made your money selling Fuller Brushes, then it is about you.
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jeremy q public
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« Reply #103 on: February 09, 2018, 06:37:53 PM »

the bold part was related to me feeling like I had to sell how good and marketable the CFL game is to some around here when you would think it would have been them trying to sell me on the idea... just a little poke of fun...

But thanks for the vote of confidence, part of what I've done in my career was process improvement and automation thru strategic partnerships with those in the private sector and the development of hardware/software applications and their implementation...  maybe I'll send the CFL a resume, lol...

What you're encountering here is probably some good ol' Canadian humility, AKA a complete lack of self-confidence. We're fully aware that the US is the big boy on the block, the NFL is the premium league, etc. so we tend to downplay the good things we have, across the board, to a fault. We assume no American is gonna watch the CFL, even when talking to an American who watches the CFL.  Grin

Some of your ideas I don't see happening, like tying teams together across the two leagues. But I could see a partnership between the TV networks and the two leagues working. You're certainly right about the demographics, we need to keep in mind how many people we're talking about here. For every Canadian football fan like me, who's only gonna watch their local team on tv, it's possible there's at least one American football fan who's gonna watch as much football as they can find. That means we could potentially double our tv market, which would add significant strength and resilience to the league.

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Throw Long Bannatyne
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« Reply #104 on: February 09, 2018, 08:14:47 PM »

What you're encountering here is probably some good ol' Canadian humility, AKA a complete lack of self-confidence. We're fully aware that the US is the big boy on the block, the NFL is the premium league, etc. so we tend to downplay the good things we have, across the board, to a fault. We assume no American is gonna watch the CFL, even when talking to an American who watches the CFL.  Grin

Some of your ideas I don't see happening, like tying teams together across the two leagues. But I could see a partnership between the TV networks and the two leagues working. You're certainly right about the demographics, we need to keep in mind how many people we're talking about here. For every Canadian football fan like me, who's only gonna watch their local team on tv, it's possible there's at least one American football fan who's gonna watch as much football as they can find. That means we could potentially double our tv market, which would add significant strength and resilience to the league.

I would think that ratio would have to be at least 10-1 to garner the attention of a US based network.  Anything is possible within a huge viewing market-place even niches can be sizeable.  The Shopping Channel has been broadcasting for at least 25 years so somebody out there must be watching it.
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